Tag: cake recipe.

Honey cake recipe for Rosh Hashanah

Honey cake recipe for Rosh HashanahHoney cake recipe for Rosh Hashannah

Every Jewish festival comes with a traditional cake. Rosh Hashanah – which is the Jewish New Year, is Honey cake. Rosh Hashanah is celebrated over two days and it’s one of the biggest festivals in the Jewish calendar. We get together and eat – a lot, gathering for big meals and lots of honey cake.

Traditionally honey cake is a really dense and heavy cake but I’ve been making lighter versions for years now. This one is made with syrup. Now I know what your thinking. If it’s made with syrup why is it called honey cake? Well, Syrup makes the cake a bit heavier than honey and that’s what my mum does and what her mum did and what her mum did. Get the picture? So I thought I’d give it a go. I didn’t want my cake to be too heavy so I made it the Genoise way. Still light but with a superior moistness! Yummarge!

Honey cake recipe for Rosh Hashannah

Print this recipe here

Honey cake recipe

  • 90g plain flour
  • 100g Self Raising flour
  • 1¼ tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 4 eggs (separated)
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 110ml syrup
  • 110ml sunflower oil
  • 110ml tea (the stronger the better)
  1. Line an 8″ baking tin well. This cake mix is more like batter than cake so it will run out of any cracks in a loose bottom tin. It’s also quite sticky once baked so I always bake in cake liners. It also makes it easier to give the cakes as gifts.
  2. Heat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC)
  3. Make the strong tea and set aside to cool a little.
  4. In a separate bowl measure out all the dry ingredients
  5. Measure the egg whites and sugar into a heat proof bowl and place over a bain-marie. You want to warm the mixture not heat it up. If it gets too warm you’ll have scrambled eggs – yuck! Whisk the ingredients to add air and make the mixture double in size. Remove from the heat and carry on whisking with a hand held whisk or in a stand mixer. Stand mixer is easier.
  6. Measure the oil into a jug and while whisking the egg whites slowly add the oil in a slow and steady trickle. Add the egg whites and the oil and whisk further.
  7. Add the cooled tea and whisk again.
  8. Sieve the dry ingredients over the cake mix. Avoid pouring the dry contents into the bowl in one go as the weight of it will burst loads of air bubbles and we need them to give the cake lightness. Fold the dry ingredients into the mix until completely combined then pour the ingredients into the cake tin. The mix will resemble a very wet batter. It will rise into a deep cake so fill the case to ¾ full.
  9. Bake in the centre of the oven for 45minutes or till the cake starts coming away from the sides. This cake is incredible light so if you press the top with your finger it will leave an indent even if the cake is baked.
  10. Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely on a rack before removing from the tin.

Honey cake recipe for Rosh Hashannah

This cake tastes great on the day of baking but even better the day after

Happy New Year to all my Jewish readers. Chag Sameach 

EmmaMT

 

Lindy Smith’s Mini Cakes Academy : Book review and giveaway

Lindy Smith’s Mini Cakes Academy

Lindy Smith Mini cakes Academy

I love doing book reviews – well, actually I love reading new cakey books and getting inspired and being desperate to share what I’ve found with you guys, but when it comes to the actual writing of these posts I always find myself waffling on and on and making them way too long. And that was the case with Lindy Smith’s Mini Cakes Academy, by David and Charles. There was just so much to share.

Lindy Smith Mini cakes Academy I’ve Interviewed and reviewed a Lindy Smith book in the past and there’s one thing you should know about her. She works REALLY hard and is really creative. She has a new book coming out in what feels like every five minutes and they are all so different and totally inspirational. How does she do it?

 Lindy Smith’s Mini Cakes Academy

The latest book is just the same. Jam packed with clever hints and tips on how to get different effects, some of them basic for the beginner and some of them more challenging but all inspirational. Sometimes you just need to be shown a new tool or colour combination to give you a whole new idea for a cake. One piece of inspiration and the book’s a winner – don’t you think?

What I love about this book are the simple ideas executed to perfection. Whether it’s the stunning colour combinations of the Rosette cake or the cute washboard sides on the beach hut cakes. The way some simple plunger cutters have been used to make an elegant Christmas tree cake look fabulous or the clever use of a flower and some piping to make the cutest diddy wedding cake. Also, there’s buttons. I love a sugarpaste button on a cake!

Lindy Smith Mini cakes Academy Why I think Lindy’s books are so great is that no matter what level you’re at there are plenty of photos to describe the techniques so you can understand the way to make every element of decorating. Some books only have one step shot and explain the rest with words and you just can’t get a handle on what they’re on about. Here Lindy explains everything in clear detail and shows you too. You can’t go wrong.Lindy Smith Mini cakes Academy

What else is in the book?

As well as seeing where the inspiration for each cake comes from there are templates and recipes (for the main size cake tins when making small cakes) and the sticky toffee cake sounds really deelish. There’s even a vegan chocolate cake in there. There are recipes to make your own sugarpaste, pastillage, flowerpaste and of course buttercreams and ganaches.

If you aren’t sure where to start when covering a fiddly mini cake there are steps to show you how with buttercream, marzipan and sugarpaste.Lindy Smith Mini cakes Academy

Whether you want to paint your cake design, create beautiful flowers, go for modern or vintage there’s something for everyone. With 30 fabulous designs you’ll be spoilt for choice.

And what’s more you can win a copy right here on CakesBakesAndCookies.com. I bet you want to don’t you?

The Mini Cakes Academy Giveaway

The lovely Lindy herself emailed me offering this book giveaway to you lovely people. How honoured and excited am I by that! All you have to do is leave a comment below answering the question AND enter via the rafflecopter site (just click below to be taken straight through to the competition) A winner will be randomly selected on 12th August.

” What cake decorating question would you ask Lindy” leave a comment below and enter the rafflecopter widget.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

EmmaMT 

Disclaimer: The book in this post was sent to me by Lindy Smith and David and Charles publishers  (Thanks you guys- it’s fantastic).  All thoughts and opinions and entirely my own.

CakesBakesAndCookies.com Giveaway Terms & Conditions

This giveaway will close at 12:00am on 12th August 2015. Leaving a blog post comment is a mandatory entry option. This prize is offered by Lindy Smith. I am hosting it on behalf of Lindy Smith. Please note, I am not responsible for posting the prize out or providing it. Lindy Smith or her representative will send out the prize, the winner must provide their name, address once contacted. The winner will be selected at random from all correct entries received by the Rafflecopter widget. The winner will be notified within 3 days of the closing date. The prize is one copy of the ‘Lindy Smith’s Mini Cakes Academy’ book, no cash alternatives are available. This giveaway is open only to residents in mainland UK (excluding Northern Ireland and Scottish Highlands and Islands) and entrants must be over 18.

FAQ: Do you have a 10″ Madeira cake recipe?

FAQ: Do you have a 10″ Madeira cake recipe?Madeira_cake_recipe

Yes I do, but boy do people seem to be having problems with it! It got to the point where I was starting to think there was something wrong with it. Readers were having cakes with soggy middles and deep dark crusts on the outside. There were massive domes and sunken middles. I was perplexed! So, I decided to double check the recipe. It came out perfectly. So here’s a post dedicated to exactly what I do to make my 10″ Madeira cake a success  – literally step by step.

Double check the size of your tin.

The first thing I did was measure the volume of water my 10″ cake could take. Previously I found it could hold 4000ml but I decided to try it with a little less – 3700ml. The reason for this is that when I make a larger cake the more mix in the tin the heavier the cake is. When I use a little less mix the cake seems to rise more. This was the case with this cake. Just removing 300ml of cake ingredients to this cake made all the difference.

Line and wrap your cake tin and chill it out!

I have always lined my cake tins using silicon paper and vegetable oil – to make it stick to the sides. Oil gives the cake a much softer finish. I know some people like a crust and if that’s the case keep using butter to grease your tins.

Once lined I wrap the cake tin with a strip of silicon paper tied with natural string. You can read more about this here. As you can see from the top photo, I use the same paper over and over and it still works well.

A new trick I recently read about was to chill the cake tin once it is lined. This further stops the outside of the cake from baking too quickly. I left mine in the fridge for 30 minutes before I filled it with cake mix and baked it.

10" Madeira cake recipeThe 10″ Madeira cake recipe

  • 235g butter at room temperature
  • 235g margarine at room temperature
  • 620g caster sugar
  • 3 tsp vanilla essence
  • 9 eggs large eggs at room temperature
  • 700g plain flour sieved
  • 5 tsp baking powder
  • 150ml hot water

Sugar syrup

  • 100ml water
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence

How to make the 10″ Madeira cake.

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC) It’s really important to get the oven to the right temperature. The rising domes are usually caused by the oven being too hot. Sunken cakes are from when the oven temperature is too low – or the oven door is opened too early. My oven fluctuates (especially with cakes that are in the oven for a long time like this one!) so I tend to let it drop a little to 175ºC to allow for the differences during the bake. I still get a dome but I don’t mind. It means I can see how well the cake is baked and get to eat a bit too. Who doesn’t love off cuts? The biggest problems with baking this cake seem to come from using a fan oven. It just doesn’t bake as well. I tested the recipe out using my fan and the cake tasted completely different and was really heavy. My mum who has a gas oven always has the lightest, fluffiest Madeira cake known to man – I am very jealous! So if oyu can use a non fan oven do. If you can use gas – even better. One last word on temperatures is to invest in an Oven Thermometer . I trust mine way more than I trust the dial on my oven – which has lied to me from day one!
  2. Start teh cake mix by creaming the butter and margarine together. Make sure they are seamlessly blended before adding the sugar. Beat till it’s pale and fluffy. This will take at least 3-4 minutes. The whiter it looks the fluffier it is which makes a lighter cake. 
  3. Very slowly add the eggs – a spoonful at a time. The slower you add the eggs the less chance there is of the mixture curdling. I have found that I have a much better mix if I use my very fast hand held whisk rather than my beloved Kitchenaid stand mixer. The hand held is much faster and whips it all up into a frenzy catching every last bit of cake mix whereas the stand mixer gets most of it most of the time. There’s no comparison. If the mixture does start curdling (separating and looking a bit yuck) add a spoonful of flour during mixing to stop it.
  4. Add the vanilla essence and mix again till it’s well incorporated.
  5. When it comes to adding the dry ingredients I tend to sieve the flour and baking powder into a separate bowl and have the hot water ready. Add the flour and water in three goes. This produces the fluffiest and most moist cake rather than adding all the flour then all the water. Fold them in gently and slowly. Fold until the flour is just incorporated. The less mixing and folding the more air bubbles you’ll have to make a light and fluffy cake. 
  6. Pour the mixture into the cake tin. Using the back of a spoon spread the mix throughout the tin pushing it up the sides of the tin slightly leaving a well in the middle. I leave quite a deep well and still get a dome so be brave.
  7. I have been loosely covering my cakes as soon as they go into the oven with a piece of silicon paper with a hole in the middle. If I think the paper is going to touch the cake as it rises I grease it first. The hole is to allow the steam to escape. The paper keeps the cake more flat on top. I tend to remove the paper for the last 30 minutes so it can brown up.
  8. Bake for two hours in the centre of your oven. If you have the choice place your cake on a wire rack in the oven rather than a tray. A tray will stop the heat from circulating. I remove all the unused racks from the oven when I bake. Don’t be tempted to open the oven door for the first 30 minutes. It will make the cake sink.
  9. To test if your cake is fully baked insert a skewer into the centre of the cake – always the centre as this is the last area to bake. If it comes out clean without any cake mix residue it’s ready. If there is some moist mix on the end you need to pop it back in for a few minutes more. You can also press lightly on the top of the cake with a finger. If the cake bounces back instantly you know it’s done. If it takes more than 2-3 seconds then you know it needs more.

    When a cake bakes the outer edge bakes first (as it’s against the hot metal cake tin.) For this reason when the middle of your cake is baked the sides will shrink away from the cake tin. This is another good indicator that the cake is baked.

10" Madeira cake recipeThe sugar syrup

  1. To make the sugar syrup heat the water and sugar until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let it simmer for 2-3 minutes then add the flavour and leave to cool. I make my sugar syrup as soon as the cake goes into the oven then I leave it .
  2. Once your cake is removed from the oven let it sit for 5-10 minutes then use a pastry brush to brush the sugar syrup over the entire cake. You only need to cover each area of the cake once and avoid soaking the cake or you will end up with a big soggy mess not a nice moist cake. Make sure you get the edges of the cake covered as they tend to dry out the most. Some people worry that the cake will be overly sweet by adding the sugar syrup but it actually seals the cake and stops it from baking once it’s out of the oven. Don’t feel you need to use the whole amount. You will have some left over.
  3. Leave the cake to cool for a further 10-20 minutes before turning your cake out onto a rack to cool completely.

Madeira cake slice - recipe

I made this cake and decided not to cover it or cut it in half and fill with butter cream. One of my favorite ways to enjoy Madeira cake is by the slice with a lovely dollop of raspberry jam. I cut this one in half and froze one side while we ate the rest. This is a pretty big cake so it was a good test of how long it tasted good for. I always advise to have eaten a cake that has been decorated (and therefore sealed) within a week of baking. This cake sat on a plate in my kitchen loosely covered with a piece of silver foil for 10 days – slowly getting smaller and smaller. On the 10th day it was getting a bit stale but right up till then a spread of jam and it was great with a cup of tea!

Why Sugar syrup works

Another benefit to adding sugar syrup to a cake – which I hadn’t realised before is that it gives the cake crust a lovely sweet flavoured crunch. Not a hard crunch – just a gentle one. I actually looked forward to eating that part as much as I did the soft sponge. Nice surprise!

I think a lovely thin slice is perfect. Beau does not! After asking if she could have a slice this is what she cut and filled for herself! I could have made four servings from that giant slice. And before you ask- yes she ate the lot! Growing girl! Beau's big slice!!!

I hope this helps with some of your Madeira cake queries.

Happy baking

EmmaMT

x

Book Review: Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking

Konditor & Cook : Book review

Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking

This is not your average baking book. This one’s different! “Why?” I hear you ask. Well the recipes are just not what you’d expect…. but in a good way. The combinations are different and unusual and dare I say it – intriguing like ‘Melon and Ginger’ slinger – which sounds more like a smoothie than a tart and ‘101% Apple pie’! How do you do that?

 

Konditor & Cook: Book reviewThe shop

For those who don’t know Konditor & Cook is a little cake shop tucked out behind Waterloo East station on Cornwall road in London. I used to walk past it on my way to work in the mornings and always had to have a good look in the window as I passed by. There was always a line of people queueing outside waiting to pick up their morning coffee and cake. Whenever someone had a birthday or celebration on the magazine a cake would be ordered from K&C – until I started baking that is!

Konditor & Cook: Book review

The Author

Konditor and Cook is the brainchild of Gerhard Jenne. He opened his little baking shop in 1993 using his skills as a pastry chief from Germany; where he studied before moving to England and training under Justin De Blank. This book is full of his most popular recipes. There’s a lot of German influence in the bakes but none of the obvious recipes. I haven’t heard of a lot of the cakes here but they look and sound so good.

Konditor & Cook: Book review

One of the best things about this book is that everything has a real “depth of flavour” as Gerhard says that’s the most important thing -and I think we would all agree with him on that? You don’t need specialist equipment to make any of these cakes – even the more decorated ones at the back- and his ethos that the recipes are easy to make just works in this day and age of our busy lives

Most of these recipes don’t take a lot of time or energy, just enthusiasm and a keen appetite” Gerhard Jenne

Konditor & Cook: Book reviewSo what’s in the book?

The book includes the following chapters. Here’s a few but by all means not all bakes included.

Cakes

Figgy fruit loaf – a cake for cheese, Stem ginger, Almond St Clement cake and sunken pear and black gingerbread cake to name just a few

Tarts and puddings

Choose from Raspberry fudge tart (a favorite at the shop), Rhubarb and orange Meringue, twice baked raspberry ricotta cheesecake with a thyme crust, Strawboffie pie, summer pudding sand and there’s more

Mini bakes

Jammilicious Linzers, Raspberry rocks Meringues (which have raspberries baked in the centres- yum), lemon and currant puff – which are next on my list, Very berry tartlets (as seen above) Kipferl cookies; a traditional Christmas biscuit in Germany,

Brownies and slices

This is where I started when I first got the book. I made the Boston brownies and they are divine! There’s also Whisky and fig brownies, Bakewell slab, Hot cross Blondies and Tarta de Santiago which was inspired by Brindisa a local Borough Market Spanish food importer.

Muffins, cupcakes and buns

If there’s one recipe that is going to get you excited in this chapter it’s the ‘Black velvet cupcakes with Irish cream frosting’. All I really have to say about this is Bailey’s Irish cream liquer. The rest you can imagine! Other tasty sounding bites are Dorset apple cakes, Iced prune buns – these are a really cute domed shape and look super delish – I’m making them this weekend.

Fun and festivities

This is where your creative talents can get into action. There are K&C’s signature ‘Magic cakes’ (I’m sure they’re called this as they disappear!), Spaghetti Bolognese cupcakes, The chocolate cabbage cake (as seen below) don’t worry it’s all chocolate and just looks like a cabbage – there’s not a green leaf to be seen inside this creation. The mulled wine cupcakes also sound amazing.

Basics, tips and techniques

Not only is this chapter full of really good, solid advice but there are more recipes and tips throughout it. There are more pastry recipes as well as frostings, custard and lemon curd all of which can be used with the recipes throughout the book. There are tips on piping, lining a cake tin and how to temper chocolate.

Konditor & Cook: Book review

My thoughts on Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking.

The photography is a lot darker and moodier in this book than in the average baking book which I’m not usually a massive fan of but with these recipes it just works. I really love the details about each bake before the recipe – either where it originates from or who inspired it. It makes the book really informative and personal, but it’s the extra details in the ‘Basics, tips and techniques’ chapter that make it a must. There are tons of really useful tips and advice that I haven’t seen before. I also really like the way it’s written. You feel like you’re having a chat with your baker friend Gerhard who’s sharing his best knowledge with you. It’s so relaxed and chatty.

Having made quite a few recipes from this book – the Boston Brownies are to die for! I really like this book. It’s good to have something a bit different on your  kitchen shelves. It has a few old favorites – coffee cake, lemon meringue pies and strawberry tarts, but the more unusual recipes are what I rate the most.

Konditor & Cook: Deservedly Legendary Baking by Ebury Press available on Amazon

Do you have this book? Would you buy it and if so why? I’d love to know.

EmmaMT x

Raspberry tray bake recipe with extra zing! And it’s dairy free.

Raspberry tray bakeI’m a big fan of using dried fruits in cakes – just look at all the sultanas and apricots I’ve featured before- namely with a touch of alcohol! but it’s only just recently that I have discovered freeze dried fruits. Have you tried them? They’re available all over the place but most often as a cake topper in the 100’s & 1000’s aisle.

Once you try them you kind of want to nosh on them all the time. They have this really intense burst of flavour. I think it’s due to the way they are made. Fresh fruit is frozen and placed in a chamber where it’s vacuum sealed and heat is applied. I don’t really understand the finer details. All I know is that they taste mighty fine when 80-90% of the water is removed. You can read all about it on Paradisefruits website.

So that’s when I thought they’d be perfect in a cake. So I decided to come up with a  raspberry cake recipe to be exact.  And they do taste great. One big reason they work so well in baking is because they’re so light they don’t sink to the bottom of the cake like heavier fruits can.

Raspberry tray bake recipe

Raspberry cake recipe

Ingredients

  • 200ml (1 cup)sunflower oil – or any other flavourless oil like vegetable
  • 210g (1cup) Caster sugar
  • 210g(1 ½ cups) Self Raising flour
  • 6 eggs- separated
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1½ tsp vanilla essence (or raspberry essence)
  • 5 tbsp Freeze dried raspberries + more for topping
  • 100g icing sugar
  • pink food colouring

How to make the cake

  1. Grease and line a baking tray with silicon paper and pre-heat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC)
  2. Place the sugar, oil, egg yolks and vanilla essence in a bowl and stir.
  3. Sieve the flour and baking powder over the mix and combine thoroughly.
  4. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites until they form peaks or they don’t fall out when you turn the bowl upside down.
  5. Fold the egg whites into the mix until no white is visible then lastly add the freeze dried raspberries and combine.
  6. Pour the mix into the baking tray and place in the oven for 25-30 minutes or until the cake bounces back when you press it lightly with your finger.
  7. Remove from the oven and leave for 10 minutes before turning out onto a rack to cool completely.
  8. Make up some runny icing and add pink colouring then pour it over the completely cool cake. Sprinkle a few more freeze dried raspberries on top and leave to set.

Freeze dried Raspberry tray bake recipe

We took this cake with us this week during half term when we visited some friends in Hertfordshire. It’s always good to have friends that understand why a chunk of the cake is missing when you arrive (well I have to take shots before it all gets eaten don’t I?) The general consensus was it was a moreish cake- especially where the icing was thickest and when you have a dollop of ice cream on the side. It’s also exceptionally light as it has oil in place of butter. Even Beau – who never lets me take her photo couldn’t wait to get in on the action! cheeky Beau

EmmaMT x

 

* Posted in partnership with Paradisefruits.co.uk, all views are my own.

Inspired Recipes : Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake

Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake. Nom nom nomHow many times have you bought some baking ingredients and seen a recipe on the side of the packaging and thought “Oooooo that looks good. I must make that some time!” and then used up the flour/sugar/butter and thrown the packaging away? Loads of times if you’re anything like me. Well, last week I picked up a tub of Stork margarine and when I went to make my cake there was a really tasty looking recipe on that paper lining you get just under the lid. “Right!” I thought. This Salted Caramel Marble cake looks totally deeelish so I AM going to make it. So I did. For camping!

Family Camping

Last weekend my family- that’s the Moomah and Poopah, my sister, her husband and son and Tim, me and the girls all went off on a camping trip to Suffolk. Now, if you live here in the UK you’ll know that it was rather wet and windy last weekend but that didn’t dampen our spirits (but it did dampen our clothes on Sunday. Actually soaked would be a better description) We had a really lovely weekend. Lots of marshmallows around the camp fire (no there wasn’t any sining) and lots of laughter. And lots of eating. I wanted to take a cake with as a treat so I baked the Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake on Thursday night and wrapped it in foil as soon as it was cool then made the icing topping Friday morning and popped it in a jam jar ready for the off. Our car was so jam packed with equipment that I had a sleeping bag and football at my feet for the entire three hour journey up there –  so a sticky cake wasn’t going to happen till we were there. I have to say I’ve never covered a cake whilst in a tent before (some may say I’m cake obsessed!) There I was hunched over the low table smearing the salted caramel icing over the cake with a plastic spoon. Was it worth it? Oh boy yes it was! Salted Caramel Marble cake The cake was incredibly light and fluffy. It tasted great.  Tim loved the salted caramel topping and combined with the dark and white chocolate cake it was a total hit on a rather chilly and windy evening. This cake is my attempt at glamping.

Slice of Stork Salted Caramel Marble cakeStork’s Salted Caramel Marble cake

Cake Ingredients

  • 175g Stork
  • 175g Caster sugar
  • 175g Self raising flour (sieved)
  • 3 Medium eggs
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 55g plain chocolate- melted
  • 55g white chocolate – melted

Salted Caramel icing Ingredients

  • 250g light soft brown sugar
  • 150ml double cream
  • 140g Stork
  • ½ tsp salt
  1. Place all the ingredients in a mixing bowl except for the chocolate and beat well until smooth. Split the mixture between two bowls and add melted dark chocolate to one and white chocolate to another.
  2. Alternate spoonfuls of mixture into a greased bottom lined 20cm (8″) cake tin and gently swirl through the mixture with a skewerMaking marble cake
  3. Bake in a pre-heated oven 170ºC, 160ºC fan for 50-60minutes. Leave to cool.
  4. To make the icing place sugar, cream and salt in a saucepan and heat until the sugar dissolves. Bubble for 3-4 minutes not stirring. Cool for 10 minutes, beat in stork. Chill until firm.
  5. Split the cake and sandwich together with half the icing. Cover the top with the remaining salted caramel icing.

I should point out that the original recipe on the packaging had a delicious looking chocolate ganache topping with truffles to finish. Although it looked amazing it was a step to far for camping so I just added the icing on the top and it was soooo good. What’s more it stayed soft for a few days. So where is the craziest place you’ve decorated a cake? I’d love to know.

EmmaMT

p.s. Thanks to Stork for allowing me to share your recipe with my readers. I’m sure they’ll love it!

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