Why I’m Stuck on Friands : Blueberry Friand recipe

Why I’m stuck on FriandsFriand

I absolutely adore Friands. Have you ever made them? They look like a mini cupcake or a squashed muffin but what they actually are is a little taste of heaven. Now, I know what you’re thinking – really? A taste of heaven?!?!? but bear with me.

I have a minor (read MAJOR) addiction to Dr Pepper which is an almond flavoured fizzy pop drink and marzipan is one of my all time favourite cake ingredients – especially when my mum adds it to her Madeira cake, so it’s no surprise that a little thing like a Friand floats my boat.

Friands are a little French cake made with ground almonds, icing sugar and egg whites. This Friand recipe is much more moist than a cupcake and have a beautiful, delicate texture unlike a muffin. They are more of a delicacy in my eyes. But, and that’s a big but, they like to get stuck in the tray. And when I say stuck I mean welded on – can’t get it out even with a knife, spoon or thin spatula -kind of stuck. So, when I baked these last night there was only one thing for it. Tim and I stood in the kitchen – me complaining that even though I coated the tray with plenty of oil those babies weren’t coming out. Tim – with a mouthful of dug out Friand said “They taste great to me” whilst attempting to get his next one out! So lesson learned. Make these delicate bakes in cupcake cases!!!

Needless to say, they didn’t go to waste and the little hits of blueberries were delish! Even baked in a silicon mould didn’t help keep them unstuck!Blueberry Friand recipe

[yumprint-recipe id=’2′]

EmmaMT x

How to make easy jam: Rhubarb Jam recipe

How to make easy jam: Rhubarb Jam recipe

Rhubarb jam recipe

Have you ever made jam?

I hadn’t until recently. I thought I needed a ton of equipment- a big pan (which has been tricky since getting an induction hob!) a thermometer, special spatulas etc. But, you just don’t need them. All you need is a regular deep saucepan, a wooden spoon to stir, a plate or two for testing and a clean jar to put it in with a sealable lid and a piece of waxed paper. That’s it. The process is super simple and the ingredients list isn’t very long at all.

You can print this recipe here

How to make easy jam

This recipe yields one large jar (¾ litre) or two regular jam jar sizes

  • 445g Rhubarb
  • Juice of one unwaxed lemon
  • 225g Jam sugar (with pectin)
  1. Place 2-3 saucers in the freezer for testing the jam on later.
  2. Sterilise the jam jars. You can buy sterilising tablets and soak or submerge the jars in a pan of water and bring to the boil for 10 minutes, but if you clean and use them when they are still hot straight from the dishwasher that’s sterilised enough too.
  3. Cut the rhubarb into small pieces and place in a deep saucepan
  4. Measure the sugar and add it to the pan along with the squeezed lemon juice making sure there are no pips
  5. Add water to the ingredients till it’s just covered and place on a low heat.
  6. Once the sugar has dissolved turn the heat up so the ingredients are boiling for five minutes and the rhubarb is soft and mushy.
  7. To test if the jam is done and will set once cooled remove the pan from the heat.  Use a tea spoon to place some jam on the back of one of the saucers from the freezer. Leave it for 30 seconds then push it with your finger. If it wrinkles up it’s ready. If it doesn’t keep boiling for another five minutes and try again on a fresh plate.
  8. Once it will set add the hot jam to warm jars and cover the ingredients inside the jar with a waxed disc of paper and close the lid. The wax paper is to protect and preserve the jam till it’s ready to eat. I don’t know why I bothered with the paper as I tucked into it that night! But if you are keeping it for longer or are planning to make some as gifts then seal it up well. This helps with keeping it sterilised.
  9. Once cooled store your jam in a dark place.

 

Tips when making jam

  • Always keep your equipment super clean.
  • Use the correct sugar. ‘Jam sugar’ has pectin in it which is a setting agent. Preserving sugar is something completely different.
  • If you’re not planning to eat the jam straight away it is doubly essential that the jam jars are sterile and the seal with wax paper and lid are air tight. Jams can last years if unopened.
  • Store unopened jam in a dark cupboard. Once open keep it in the fridge.
  • Keep your jam mould free for longer by not allowing sticky kids to stick knives inside the jar when it’s covered in butter (we all know they don’t mean to but goodness me!) We have a tea spoon rule for jam in our house and it lasts a lot longer now. I tell them it’s what the queen / Kate Middleton do!

How to make Rhubarb jam recipeenjoy!

EmmaMT x

How to make Challah bread: baking with mum

Challah bread baking with mumChallah recipe

Last week I went along to a challah baking day at the synagogue which was organised by my mum. I don’t tend to make bread all that often – being an impatient, quick bake a cake so I can eat it now, kind of girl. So this day was a real change for me.

There were fourteen bakers on the workshop and the ages literally spanned the generations from a two year old right up to granny ages ( I won’t divulge!)  We started out with all the ingredients measured into bowls for us and the lovely Israeli Dorit showed us what to do.

Bread dough feels so different from any other baking I do. It’s got a soft, squishiness to it. As a newbie I had no idea when to stop kneading and when to add flour, water or as was the case with one really sticky dough – oil! (yes we literally had the dough sticking to the table top then a dribble of oil and another knead and it was all together and smooth- no longer sticking anything not even our hands!)

After each stage we had to leave the dough to proove which meant tea and cakes with a good old natter while we waited. Once the Challah dough was ready Dorit showed us how to plait with three, four or more lengths. You literally just lift the right hand length then weave it under and over the other lengths. Then pic up the new right hand one and continue. The end result looked great once I had curled my plait into a circle.

Once out of the oven and smothered in honey the Challah was ready to be left to cool before eating – for once I waited! The bread was totally delicious.

You can print off this recipe here

Challah recipe

Starter:

  • 9g (2 ½ tsp) dried yeast
  • 25g (2 tbsp) sugar
  • 400ml (1 ½ cups) of warm water
  • 20g (2 tbsp) plain flour

Dough

  • 940g (6 cups) of plain flour
  • 135ml (⅓ cup) honey
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 medium egg whisked
  • 100g soft margarine

Decoration

  • 1 medium egg whisked
  • 2 tbsp honey (optional)
  • seasame seeds or poppy seeds

How to make Challah

This recipe is enough to make one whoppa of a challah or two good sized ones.

  1. In a small bowl mix the starter ingredients together with just a little of the water. Mix it into a paste before adding the rest of the water. It will become slightly frothy. Set aside for 10 minutes.
  2. Place all the dough ingredients into a large bowl and mix with a spoon to combine then get your hands stuck in and knead it till it’s a ball of sticky-ish dough.
  3. Cover with a tea towel and place in a warm room (the airing cupboard is perfect) and leave for an hour till the dough has doubled in size.
  4. BreadKnead the dough to knock the air out of it using a little olive oil if necessary. Set aside for another hour.
  5. Divide the dough into three equal balls, roll into long lengths then plait them together – tucking the ends underneath.
  6. Leave on the baking tray lined with baking paper for another 40 minutes so it rises even more.
  7. Heat your oven to 190ºC (Fan 170ºC). Brush with the egg wash and sprinkle seeds liberally over the top.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes or until the Challah sounds hollow when you tap it underneath.
  9. Brush honey over the top using a pastry brush as soon as the Challah comes out of the oven. Leave to cool.Challa recipe

Thanks mum for organising the Great Catford Challah bake. Everyone had a great time (and I hope we can do it again some time!)

EmmaMT x

 

p.s. A word of warning- Don’t bake bread on a Sunday evening, fall asleep in front of Downton Abbey and not hear the oven timer going off. The end result will not be good!

Burnt Challah

Chocolate Ganache Recipe

Chocolate Ganache Recipe
Chocolate Ganache

If you follow me on Instagram then you would have already seen this picture of the chocolate ganache I made for a birthday cake a few weeks ago. I totally love ganache. I mean what’s not to love – it’s chocolate and cream!

I thought I’d share my recipe with you as it’s really handy to have – especially at this time of year when you’re thinking about making chocolate truffles asChristmas gifts. Usually I use double cream but I had some dairy free soya cream alternative left over so I used that and it was absolutely delish. Soya milk and cream are so much more creamy tasting that regular ones. I think I’ll be using them every time in the future- what’s more it’s great to have a dairy free ganache in your repertoire- don’t you think?

Print off the Chocolate Ganache Recipe here

Chocolate Ganache Recipe

Ingredients (this recipe is enough to sandwich and cover an 8″ cake

• 200ml double cream
• 250g dark chocolate- broken into small pieces

To make the ganache

  1. Place the cream in a bain- marie over a low heat making sure that the bowl doesn’t touch the water below.
  2. Heat the cream till very hot but not boiling – it will burn very quickly and you don’t need it that hot.
  3. Remove the bowl from the heat and add the chocolate pieces.
  4. Stir until all the chocolate and cream is melted and combined.
  5. Set aside to cool then pipe or spread over your cake with a palette knife.

Tips with Ganache

  • You can add half as much chocolate again to your mix (ie another 125g) to make your ganache a thicker consistency. Much more chocolate than that and it will be very firm and won’t be easy to spread on a cake.
  • For a dairy free ganache use dark chocolate (Bourneville is buttermilk free – most others aren’t) and a soya dairy free cream. Even if it is single cream the ganache will still taste fab – just add a few more squares of chocolate to thicken it up.
  • Milk and white chocolate both work well with this recipe too.
  • This recipe is great for making truffles. Simply add a tablespoon of flavour – alcohol always works well, once the cream and chocolate are combined. Set aside to cool then roll into balls. Cover in cocoa powder, icing sugar or anything your heart desire.

    EmmaMT x

The Great British Bake off in numbers

The Great British Bake off in numbers

I’m a big fan of infographics, aren’t you? So when I was sent this Great British Bake Off one earlier this week I just had to share it with you. I’m super excited to see the finale tonight (along with an estimated 12.29 million other viewers) but a bit gutted that I can’t watch it live- I shall be avoiding all forms of social media till I watch it.

Who do you think will win?

EmmaMT

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipeLemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

I’ve been wanting to test out this Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe for ages. I made it a few years ago for my sister’s charity cake morning but I didn’t measure the ingredients or take photos so when fellow Free Cakes For Kids volunteer Zowie had a Macmillian coffee morning  this weekend I thought it was the perfect opportunity to make it again.

It’s a bit of a show stopper as this time I made it three tiers tall and I have finally worked out how to have a decent amount of buttercream between layers without it all squidging out from the sides.

You can print this recipe and instructions here 

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

Cake ingredients

  • 170g Butter – at room temperature
  • 170g margarine – at room temperature
  • 400g caster sugar
  • Juice 1 lemon and 1 lime  (3 ½ tbsp cake, 1tbsp sugar syrup and 1 ½ tbsp buttercream)
  • Rind of 1 lemon and 1 lime  (½ for the cake, ½ for the buttercream)
  • 7 medium eggs- at room temperature
  • 510 plain flour
  • 3 ½ tsp baking powder
  • 7 tbsp water

Sugar syrup ingredients

  • 40g caster sugar
  • 40ml water
  • 1 tbsp lemon & lime juice (taken from original fruit)

Buttercream ingredients

  • 450g butter- at room temperature
  • 450g sieved icing sugar
  • 1 ½ tbsp lemon & lime juice (taken from original fruit)
  • Lemon and lime rind

How to make the Lemon and Lime Madeira cake

To make the cake

  1. Line three 8″ cake tins with silicon paper and pre heat your oven to

    180ºC (Fan oven160ºC). I use sunflower oil to grease the tins so the cakes stay soft. Butter tends to bake too quickly giving you a harder cake on the outside.

  2. Start by creaming the butters together then add the sugar and beat till it’s pale and fluffy.

  3. Very slowly add the eggs – a spoonful at a time. Add a spoon of the flour to prevent curdling if necessary.

  4. Grate all of the rind from the lemon and the lime then juice them both. Run the juice through a sieve so there are no pips or pith. These will be used for the cake, the buttercream and the sugar syrup so don’t put it all in the cake at once or you’ll end up with a very, very zingy cake! Put 3 ½ tbsp of juice into the cake mix and set the rest aside.
  5. Sieve the flour and baking powder into a separate bowl and have the hot water ready. Add the flour and water in three goes. This produces the fluffiest and most moist cake rather than adding all the flour then all the water.

  6. Finally fold in half the zests.

  7. Spoon into the three cake tins. The mixture should be 565g for each tin – if you want really even cakes.
  8. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until a skewer comes out of the centre clean.

  9. Don’t open the oven door for the first 20 minutes. It will make the cake sink.

  10. Place the cakes on a wire to cool.

  11. Make the sugar syrup while the cakes are baking.

To make the sugar syrup

  1. Place the water and sugar into a saucepan and bring to a simmer.
  2. Simmer until all the sugar has dissolved then add the lemon and lime juice.
  3. Set aside and allow to cool.
  4. Once the cakes are out of the oven brush over the top of each cake with the sugar syrup. You only need to cover each area once. Don’t be tempted to put too much syrup on or you’ll end up with a soggy mess.
  5. Leave the cakes to cool for 15 minutes before turning them out of the tin to go completely cold before you arrange them with buttercream.

To make the buttercream

  1. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and beat until light and fluffy. This will take 3-5 minutes. If using a stand mixer you can carefully place a tea towel over the mixer -around the outside of the bowl to prevent the icing sugar being thrown out all over the place. If using a hand held mixer loosely combine the ingredients before whisking. 

  2. Make sure the cakes are level by cutting off any domes from the tops

  3. Fill a piping bag with a wide nozzle with the buttercream. Pipe dots all around the bottom cake layer then fill the inside. Use a spatula to smooth it a little.

  4. Place the next layer on top then repeat with the next layer of buttercream finishing off with the top layer of cake.
  5. Place in the fridge to chill for 10 minutes. This encourages the buttercream to harden up a little making it easier to spread buttercream on the outside edges.
  6. Use a little of the buttercream to spread a crumb coating on the top and outside edge – filling any gaps between the layers as you go, then chill in the fridge for 20 minutes. The longer it’s in the fridge the harder the coating will get and the easier