Category: Cake recipe

Lemon and Blueberry tray bake recipe

Lemon and Blueberry tray bake recipe

Lemon and Blueberry tray bake recipeMost Friday’s my dad pops round to my house with a delivery of fruit and veg that would rival a Sainsbury’s delivery truck. He gets it for us (that’s me and my sister – as she gets a delivery too) to share as he bought us both a Nutribullet last November and we’re all mad keen on smoothies now – especially Tim. I got told off for not drinking my smoothie earlier this week. Tim makes Nutribullet smoothies first thing in the morning and then that’s it.  Six AM and we’ve already had our 5 a day! So we really go through a lot of fruit and veg. How cool is that? My Poopah is the best. (Thanks Poopah)

Last week he bought some blueberries. There were loads and loads of them;  more than we could blend in a week – so you know what I wanted to do don’t you? Yep. Bake!

I decided that I would make a tray bake- as I’ve just made a load for other people recently and there was no cake in the house! Well, with all that healthy smoothie making I needed to address the sugar/healthy eating imbalance. This tray bake is adapted from a Mary Berry recipe that I have used time and again from her Baking Bible book.

When Tim tasted it he said “I’m not sure about the lemon and blueberry combination”. I thought it tasted great. I then went off for a bit and when I came back the three slices of cake I had just cut were gone. Errrrr? Not such a bad combination after all is it Tim?

Lemon and Blueberry tray bakeLemon and Blueberry tray bake recipe

  • 225g butter at room temperature
  • 225g Golden caster sugar
  • 275 Self Raising flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 4 large eggs – at room temperature
  • zest and juice of one lemon
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 150g blueberries for the cake plus some extras for decoration.
  • 100g icing sugar
  • juice of one lemon
  1. Line an 8 x 10″ tray with silicon paper. Pre-heat your oven to 180C (160C for fan ovens)
  2. Mix the butter and sugar together until well blended. Break up the eggs in a bowl then add slowly to the cake mix so that it doesn’t curdle.
  3.  In a separate bowl sieve the flour and baking powder then add to the butter/sugar mix. Add the lemon zest and juice and water. Whisk until smooth and creamy.
  4. Gently fold in the blueberries then pour the mix into the tray. Level it with the back of a large tablespoon and bake for 34-45 minutes until the cake comes away from the side of the cake tin and the cake bounces back instantly when pressed in the centre with your finger.
  5. Set on a cooling rack for 10 minutes before removing from the tin to cool completely.
  6. Once cool make the icing by sieving the icing sugar into a bowl then adding the lemon juice and mixing until smooth. You can add lemon zest to the icing too if you want. Add the blueberries to the top then leave for 30 minutes and allow it to set.

 

This is a great cake to share. What do you think? Lemon and blueberry a winning combination or not?

EmmaMT

Book Review: Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking

Konditor & Cook : Book review

Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking

This is not your average baking book. This one’s different! “Why?” I hear you ask. Well the recipes are just not what you’d expect…. but in a good way. The combinations are different and unusual and dare I say it – intriguing like ‘Melon and Ginger’ slinger – which sounds more like a smoothie than a tart and ‘101% Apple pie’! How do you do that?

 

Konditor & Cook: Book reviewThe shop

For those who don’t know Konditor & Cook is a little cake shop tucked out behind Waterloo East station on Cornwall road in London. I used to walk past it on my way to work in the mornings and always had to have a good look in the window as I passed by. There was always a line of people queueing outside waiting to pick up their morning coffee and cake. Whenever someone had a birthday or celebration on the magazine a cake would be ordered from K&C – until I started baking that is!

Konditor & Cook: Book review

The Author

Konditor and Cook is the brainchild of Gerhard Jenne. He opened his little baking shop in 1993 using his skills as a pastry chief from Germany; where he studied before moving to England and training under Justin De Blank. This book is full of his most popular recipes. There’s a lot of German influence in the bakes but none of the obvious recipes. I haven’t heard of a lot of the cakes here but they look and sound so good.

Konditor & Cook: Book review

One of the best things about this book is that everything has a real “depth of flavour” as Gerhard says that’s the most important thing -and I think we would all agree with him on that? You don’t need specialist equipment to make any of these cakes – even the more decorated ones at the back- and his ethos that the recipes are easy to make just works in this day and age of our busy lives

Most of these recipes don’t take a lot of time or energy, just enthusiasm and a keen appetite” Gerhard Jenne

Konditor & Cook: Book reviewSo what’s in the book?

The book includes the following chapters. Here’s a few but by all means not all bakes included.

Cakes

Figgy fruit loaf – a cake for cheese, Stem ginger, Almond St Clement cake and sunken pear and black gingerbread cake to name just a few

Tarts and puddings

Choose from Raspberry fudge tart (a favorite at the shop), Rhubarb and orange Meringue, twice baked raspberry ricotta cheesecake with a thyme crust, Strawboffie pie, summer pudding sand and there’s more

Mini bakes

Jammilicious Linzers, Raspberry rocks Meringues (which have raspberries baked in the centres- yum), lemon and currant puff – which are next on my list, Very berry tartlets (as seen above) Kipferl cookies; a traditional Christmas biscuit in Germany,

Brownies and slices

This is where I started when I first got the book. I made the Boston brownies and they are divine! There’s also Whisky and fig brownies, Bakewell slab, Hot cross Blondies and Tarta de Santiago which was inspired by Brindisa a local Borough Market Spanish food importer.

Muffins, cupcakes and buns

If there’s one recipe that is going to get you excited in this chapter it’s the ‘Black velvet cupcakes with Irish cream frosting’. All I really have to say about this is Bailey’s Irish cream liquer. The rest you can imagine! Other tasty sounding bites are Dorset apple cakes, Iced prune buns – these are a really cute domed shape and look super delish – I’m making them this weekend.

Fun and festivities

This is where your creative talents can get into action. There are K&C’s signature ‘Magic cakes’ (I’m sure they’re called this as they disappear!), Spaghetti Bolognese cupcakes, The chocolate cabbage cake (as seen below) don’t worry it’s all chocolate and just looks like a cabbage – there’s not a green leaf to be seen inside this creation. The mulled wine cupcakes also sound amazing.

Basics, tips and techniques

Not only is this chapter full of really good, solid advice but there are more recipes and tips throughout it. There are more pastry recipes as well as frostings, custard and lemon curd all of which can be used with the recipes throughout the book. There are tips on piping, lining a cake tin and how to temper chocolate.

Konditor & Cook: Book review

My thoughts on Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking.

The photography is a lot darker and moodier in this book than in the average baking book which I’m not usually a massive fan of but with these recipes it just works. I really love the details about each bake before the recipe – either where it originates from or who inspired it. It makes the book really informative and personal, but it’s the extra details in the ‘Basics, tips and techniques’ chapter that make it a must. There are tons of really useful tips and advice that I haven’t seen before. I also really like the way it’s written. You feel like you’re having a chat with your baker friend Gerhard who’s sharing his best knowledge with you. It’s so relaxed and chatty.

Having made quite a few recipes from this book – the Boston Brownies are to die for! I really like this book. It’s good to have something a bit different on your  kitchen shelves. It has a few old favorites – coffee cake, lemon meringue pies and strawberry tarts, but the more unusual recipes are what I rate the most.

Konditor & Cook: Deservedly Legendary Baking by Ebury Press available on Amazon

Do you have this book? Would you buy it and if so why? I’d love to know.

EmmaMT x

Inspired Recipes : Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake

Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake. Nom nom nomHow many times have you bought some baking ingredients and seen a recipe on the side of the packaging and thought “Oooooo that looks good. I must make that some time!” and then used up the flour/sugar/butter and thrown the packaging away? Loads of times if you’re anything like me. Well, last week I picked up a tub of Stork margarine and when I went to make my cake there was a really tasty looking recipe on that paper lining you get just under the lid. “Right!” I thought. This Salted Caramel Marble cake looks totally deeelish so I AM going to make it. So I did. For camping!

Family Camping

Last weekend my family- that’s the Moomah and Poopah, my sister, her husband and son and Tim, me and the girls all went off on a camping trip to Suffolk. Now, if you live here in the UK you’ll know that it was rather wet and windy last weekend but that didn’t dampen our spirits (but it did dampen our clothes on Sunday. Actually soaked would be a better description) We had a really lovely weekend. Lots of marshmallows around the camp fire (no there wasn’t any sining) and lots of laughter. And lots of eating. I wanted to take a cake with as a treat so I baked the Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake on Thursday night and wrapped it in foil as soon as it was cool then made the icing topping Friday morning and popped it in a jam jar ready for the off. Our car was so jam packed with equipment that I had a sleeping bag and football at my feet for the entire three hour journey up there –  so a sticky cake wasn’t going to happen till we were there. I have to say I’ve never covered a cake whilst in a tent before (some may say I’m cake obsessed!) There I was hunched over the low table smearing the salted caramel icing over the cake with a plastic spoon. Was it worth it? Oh boy yes it was! Salted Caramel Marble cake The cake was incredibly light and fluffy. It tasted great.  Tim loved the salted caramel topping and combined with the dark and white chocolate cake it was a total hit on a rather chilly and windy evening. This cake is my attempt at glamping.

Slice of Stork Salted Caramel Marble cakeStork’s Salted Caramel Marble cake

Cake Ingredients

  • 175g Stork
  • 175g Caster sugar
  • 175g Self raising flour (sieved)
  • 3 Medium eggs
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 55g plain chocolate- melted
  • 55g white chocolate – melted

Salted Caramel icing Ingredients

  • 250g light soft brown sugar
  • 150ml double cream
  • 140g Stork
  • ½ tsp salt
  1. Place all the ingredients in a mixing bowl except for the chocolate and beat well until smooth. Split the mixture between two bowls and add melted dark chocolate to one and white chocolate to another.
  2. Alternate spoonfuls of mixture into a greased bottom lined 20cm (8″) cake tin and gently swirl through the mixture with a skewerMaking marble cake
  3. Bake in a pre-heated oven 170ºC, 160ºC fan for 50-60minutes. Leave to cool.
  4. To make the icing place sugar, cream and salt in a saucepan and heat until the sugar dissolves. Bubble for 3-4 minutes not stirring. Cool for 10 minutes, beat in stork. Chill until firm.
  5. Split the cake and sandwich together with half the icing. Cover the top with the remaining salted caramel icing.

I should point out that the original recipe on the packaging had a delicious looking chocolate ganache topping with truffles to finish. Although it looked amazing it was a step to far for camping so I just added the icing on the top and it was soooo good. What’s more it stayed soft for a few days. So where is the craziest place you’ve decorated a cake? I’d love to know.

EmmaMT

p.s. Thanks to Stork for allowing me to share your recipe with my readers. I’m sure they’ll love it!

Whisky cake recipe – perfect for Father’s Day

Whiskey cakeFather’s day whisky cake

This is a cake I made for AchicaLiving.com to celebrate Father’s day. My dad likes a drop of Whiskey and I thought it was a pretty manly way to make a cake – if you follow my meaning.

When I make a cake for Achica I have to make it ahead of time. It’s a planned post -usually weeks before it goes live, so I decided to soak the fruit and make the cake a few days later, but three days turned into three weeks and the fruits which were soaking in the whiskey were seriously alcoholic by that time! When I finally got around to baking the cake my in laws were popping round for a cuppa so they were my gineau pigs. They loved it. I cut a massive slice for my dad and took it round all wrapped up. I set it down on the table and said “Here’s a slice of whiskey cake for you” and his eyes literally lit up. So when we celebrated his birthday last week it was a no brainer what cake I was going to make!

Whiskey cake Rocks!Whiskey Cake

Ingredients

  • 200g dried apricots (cut into small pieces) 
  • zest and juice of one lemon
  • 150ml whisky
  • 175g butter at room temperature
  • 175g brown sugar (sieved)
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3 egg whites
  • 50ml whisky
  • 200g self raising flour 
  • ½ tsp baking powder

For the topping(chocolate topping as seen on the AchicaLiving post)

  • 50g butter
  • 100g milk chocolate
  • 1 tbsp whisky
  • 100g icing sugar
  • 1 tbsp milk 
  1. For the best tasting cake place the fruits in an airtight container with the whisky and lemon zest and juice and leave to infuse for 48-72 hours. You can leave it for longer to give the fruits a stronger flavour.
  2. To make the cake, oil (with sunflower oil) and line an 8” cake tin with greaseproof paper. Preheat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC).
  3. Mix the butter and sugar in a bowl then add the yolks one at a time. Incorporate the whisky. 
  4. Sieve the flour and baking powder into the mix and combine well. 
  5. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites till they form stiff peaks then fold them in till completely incorporated.
  6. Finally add the boozy fruits making sure to get every drop of whiskey out of the container and all the fruit is coated in cake mix. 
  7. Pour into your cake tin and level with the back of a spoon. Bake for 45-50 minutes until the top is golden brown and the sides have come away from the tin. 
  8. Remove from the oven and leave to cool in the tin for ten minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. 

To make the frosting.

  1. Once the cake is completely cold place the chocolate and butter in a saucepan over a low heat until they are completely melted. Stir continuously. Add the whisky then set aside to cool for a few minutes. 
  2. Sieve the icing sugar into a bowl then add the chocolate mix. Whisk until combined then add a little milk at a time. The ganache should look glossy. 
  3. Leave to cool for a few minutes before covering your cake completely. 

EmmaMT

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The Classic Victoria Sandwich – made healthier


The Classic Victoria Sandwich – Made Healthier 

(Guest post by Amelie Cartwright)

Victoria Sponge
Most bakers have a recipe of some sort that they will always come back to, and it’s something that they will always have no trouble preparing for birthday parties or other special occasions. Be it a simple vanilla cupcake recipe or their grandmother’s chocolate chip cookie recipe, every baker needs to have a go-to recipe. 

If you’ve yet to find yours and are searching for a recipe that’s both simple to make, but still elegant and versatile, then this recipe for a classic Victoria sponge might be just what you’re looking for. It’s a rather easy cake to make and assemble – a simple stack of two sponge cakes filled with any filling and frosting of your choice. The classic Victoria sandwich has become something of a staple of British bakeries, and Blair Smethurst, Quality and Innovation Development Chef for M&S, has even released a short video tutorial for baking lemon Victoria sponges. You can see it here ( EmmaMT here!- I love what Blair does with the lemon glaze)

This recipe, however, adds a twist to the classic Victoria sponge by making it much healthier. The original recipes are overflowing with sugar and fat, but some simple substitutions can cut half of the fat out of the finished product without sacrificing its taste. 

Ingredients 
· 2 tbsp of rapeseed oil, plus some extra for greasing 
· 175g of self-raising flour 
· 1 ½ tsp of baking powder 
· 140g of golden caster sugar 
· 25g of ground almonds 
· 2 large eggs 
· 175g of natural yoghurt 
· 2-3 drops of vanilla extract 
· 25g of melted butter 
· 4 tbsp of your favourite fruit conserve or jam 
· Icing sugar, for decorating 

Preheat your oven to 180 deg C, and lightly grease two 18cm sandwich cake tins and line the bottoms with parchment paper. 

In a large mixing bowl, tip the flour, baking powder, caster sugar, and ground almonds together and mix well and form into a mound. Make a well in the centre. 

Beat the eggs in a bowl and stir in the yoghurt and the vanilla. Pour this mixture, as well as the oil and melted butter, into the well in the mound of dry ingredients. Stir briefly together until the mixture is well-combined. 

Divide the mixture evenly among the two baking tins and level the tops. Bake both cakes together for 20 minutes, until they’ve risen and started to come away slightly from the sides of the baking tins. 

Remove the cakes from the oven, and use a round-bladed knife to loosen the sides from the tin. After a brief cooling period, turn them out and peel off the parchment paper. Allow them to sit on a wire rack, and leave them to cool completely. 

Assembling the cake is also a breeze: simply put one of the cakes on a serving plate, and use your favourite jam or conserve. Frugal Feeding has some great ideas for homemade jams, which could really take your Victoria sponge to the next level. Pile on the other cake to finish your sandwich, and dust with icing sugar! 

Victoria Sponge recipe

Thanks to my lovely friend Amelie Cartwright for writing this guest post. It’s made me very hungry! EmmaMT

Leiths ‘How to Cook’ Lemon Tart recipe

Leiths Lemon tart recipe

As promised here is the Lemon tart recipe from Leiths latest book Leiths How to Cook (Quadrille, £30). Photograph: Peter Cassidy.   (see the whole book review here) It also includes the delicious pâte sucrée recipe too! Thanks Quadrille for letting me do this extract. It looks sooooo good!

Lemon tart

Serves 6
  • 1 quantity pâte sucrée (below)
  • Extra flour, to dust

For the filling

  • 3 lemons
  • 6 eggs, plus 1 extra yolk
  • 150–170g caster sugar
  • 225ml double cream
  • Icing sugar, to dust
1. To make the filling, finely grate the zest of the lemons and squeeze the juice; you will need about 100–125ml juice. Put the eggs and extra yolk into a large bowl, add 150g of the sugar and, using a balloon whisk, mix well. Add the cream, zest and juice, and stir until combined. Cover and chill in the fridge for 2–3 hours, preferably overnight, to allow the flavours to develop.
2. Roll out the pâte sucrée on a lightly floured surface into a disc about 30cm in diameter and about 3mm thick. Use to line a 24cm loose-based flan tin or flan ring set on a baking sheet. Cover with cling film and chill until very firm to the touch. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 190°C/gas mark 5.
3 Once the pastry is firm, make a cartouche of greaseproof paper 8-10cm bigger than the tart tin. Scrunch it up then unfold it and use to line the pastry case. Add a layer of dried beans or ceramic baking beans. Blind bake the pastry for 15–20 minutes, ensuring the paper cartouche is pushed well into the corners of the pastry and the excess paper is folded over the edge of the pastry case, to help prevent the pastry from browning. Remove the beans and cartouche, taking care as the pastry is still very soft, and bake for a further 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and reduce the oven temperature to 150°C/gas mark 2.
4 Taste the filling. If it seems too sharp, add some or all of the remaining sugar, to taste. Strain into a jug and pour the filling into the pastry case, filling it about half full. Transfer the tart to the oven and pour in more filling until the tart is as full as possible. Bake for40–50 minutes until almost set, with a very soft wobble across the surface. A violent ripple across the middle of the filling indicates it is not set.
5 Take the tart out of the oven as soon as the filling is set, allow it to cool a little, then carefully remove the sides of the tin or flan ring. Leave to cool completely, then dust with icing sugar. You can glaze the icing sugar dusting using a kitchen blowtorch if you wish, but take care not to burn the pastry.

Pâte sucrée

This is an enriched version of shortcrust pastry, with extra butter and egg yolks replacing the water. We use a traditional method of making pâte sucrée by hand, although it can be made in a food processor. It tends to be cooked at a slightly lower temperature than shortcrust because of its high fat and sugar content, as fats and sugars both encourage browning. It should be thoroughly cooked but only to a very pale biscuit colour. Once cooked, it needs to be released from tins or baking trays while still warm, or the pastry will stick.Makes enough to line a 24cm flan ring

  • 250g plain flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 125g unsalted butter, softened
  • 125g caster sugar
  • 4 small egg yolks
  • 2–3 drops of vanilla extract
1 Sift the flour and salt onto a clean work surface and, using the side of your hand, spread the flour out into a large ring.
2 Place the softened butter, in one piece, in the middle and, using the fingertips of one hand, push down (‘peck’) on the butter to soften it a little more, but without it becoming greasy; it should be soft, but still cold. It is important that the butter is uniformly soft, as if there are still small lumps of cold, hard butter in the mixture they
 an cause greasiness and holes in the finished pastry.
3 Sprinkle over the sugar and ‘peck’ until the sugar is just fully incorporated.
4 Add the egg yolks and vanilla extract and continue to ‘peck’ until the egg yolk is fully incorporated and there is no colour streakiness.
5 Using a palette knife, flick all the flour onto the butter, sugar and egg yolks and, using the edge of the palette knife, ‘chop’ the flour into the butter and sugar mixture. This technique helps to keep the flour from being overworked. Use the palette knife to lift any flour left on the work surface to the top occasionally.
6 As you continue to do this, you will create large flakes of pastry. Continue until there are no obvious dry floury bits among the pastry; it should be a fairly uniform colour. Floury patches at this stage will mean having to overwork the pastry at the next stage to incorporate them.
7 Now shape the pastry into a long sausage and, using the palette knife on its side, scrape a little of the large flakes together at a time. This will finally bring the pastry together and is called ‘fraisering’. As more pastry sticks to the palette knife, scrape it off using a cutlery knife to avoid overworking it. Continue in this manner until all the pastry is fraisered: one or two more fraiserings are possible, but the more you fraiser the more the pastry will be overworked.
8 Bring the pastry together with your hands to form a ball.
9 Now shape the pastry into a flat disc. Wrap well in cling film and chill to allow the butter to firm up before rolling out.

EmmaMT

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Leiths How to Cook (Quadrille, £30).Amazon, Photograph: Peter Cassidy. How to Cook

 

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